As a host, you pride yourself on providing top-notch hospitality to guests from every background. This also includes hosting people with disabilities, and there are a few easy tweaks you can make to your experience to make it accessibility-friendly.

Working with Suzanne, an Accessibility Market Manager at Airbnb and a full-time wheelchair user who is passionate about the accessible travel industry, we wanted to share the importance of thinking about mobility when designing and hosting your experience.

Adding accessibility to your experience page 

While it’s not necessary to have formal training to host guests with disabilities, it’s important to run through how you can prepare for all types of guests to book your experience. Take a step back and think through what your guests may need. Are there stairs involved? Does the venue have wheelchair access?

Head to your experience (airbnb.com/host/experiences) and under Guest Requirements, there is a section called Additional Requirements. In this section, you can create the heading “Accessibility information.”

 

If you host in a single location, consider adding this info if it applies to your experience:

  • Step-free entry: If the location doesn’t have step-free entry and there isn’t a ramp or alternative entrance, guests with a mobility issue may not be able to take part.
  • Turning space: A small or cramped location may make it difficult for wheelchair users to move around easily.
  • Accessible toilets: It’s important for the guest to know whether there is a suitable accessible toilet available during the experience.
  • Accessible parking: Public transport can be a difficult option for guests with disabilities, so including info about nearby accessible parking can be very helpful.
  • Specialist equipment: If you provide any adapted or modified equipment, tell your guests! It may make your experience more enjoyable for guests with disabilities.

For example, here is an example of the accessibility information that could be included on an intimate concert’s page:

There are 3 steps from the pavement to get into the main entrance of the venue, but there is a side entrance that has level access. The venue is open plan and very spacious – there would be no problems for a wheelchair to move around easily. There is a disabled toilet at the venue with grab rails and an emergency pull cord. There is no parking on site at the venue, but there is a public car park 200 meters away which has 5 disabled spaces. Parking costs £10 for 3 hours. My experience is inclusive for guests with a visual impairment, hearing impairment, cognitive or learning disability. Please get in touch to discuss your specific requirements before booking.

If you host in multiple locations, consider adding this info if it applies to your experience:

  • Step-free route: Having a tour without steps means that it will be suitable for many more guests, including wheelchair users or guests with a pushchair or buggy.
  • Level terrain: Highlighting any parts of your route that has steep gradients or has an uneven surface will allow guests with mobility issues to decide whether they are able to tackle the terrain.
  • Accessible toilets: It’s important for the guest to know whether there is a suitable accessible toilet available during the experience.
  • Accessible parking: Public transport can be a difficult option for guests with disabilities, so including info about nearby accessible parking can be very helpful.
  • Specialist equipment: If you provide any adapted or modified equipment, tell your guests! It may make your experience more enjoyable for guests with disabilities.

For example, here is an example of the accessibility information that could be included on a walking tour’s page:

The route is completely step free and we will always cross the road at a designated crossing with a dropped curb. In general the terrain is flat, although there is a small section of about 50 meters where there is a relatively steep hill. I am happy to provide any help getting up the hill if you would like. There is also a small part of the route that has cobblestones, but this can be avoided if you would prefer. Please let me know in advance. Half way along the route there are some public disabled toilets. They can only be accessed with a Radar Key. Please let me know if you do not have a Radar Key and I will make sure I have one. There is no designated parking available at the start of the tour, but there is a nearby public car park. Please ask me if you would like more details. My experience is inclusive for guests with a visual impairment, hearing impairment, cognitive or learning disability. Please get in touch to discuss your specific requirements before booking.

Forget something?

If you leave something out on your experience page, don’t worry. Guests know what they need most and will ask if there are any questions.

Not all experiences will be able to accommodate guests with disabilities—and that’s okay! The important thing is to provide as much information in your experience listing as you can so guests can make an informed decision about their participation.